We Found Ida Grace Laing’s Stone. Then We Found Her Story.

You’ve read about the repairs… Now here’s Ida’s history.

Welcome to another Woodland Cemetery blog post! We’ve found time to write a few more blogs between planning for Doors Open London on September 14th and 15th (we’ll be running tours from 1pm-5pm each day, come say hi!) and wrapping up our summer history work.

Yesterday was a very special day for our summer team – it was the 147th anniversary of Ida Grace Laing’s passing. Robyn and Brienna found baby Ida’s headstone earlier in the summer – you can read about their repairs here – but since then we’ve uncovered a brief timeline of her life and discovered what happened to her family members.

Want to find the stone? Face the middle mausoleum-in-the-wall near Section R and turn around. Walk forward down the path until you see a sign for Section R. Approach the grey granite stone for the Rowland family to your right. Look to your left and walk up to the Footitt memorial. Head straight ahead from here until you see a tall, grey stone with a large sphere for the Hayman family to your right. Ida’s small, white stone will be to your left.

This stone is the only monument we’ve found in this lot. Ida’s brother Major George Stanley Laing owns all four corners of lot 243, though Ida and George were born five years apart and never met. Two of Ida’s six siblings are buried here as well – let’s explore their story through the documents they left behind.

Meet George and Caroline Laing.

Ida was born on June 26, 1871 to her parents George and Caroline Laing. She was their second daughter and followed her sister Florence Evelyn Maud Laing’s birth on April 22, 1869. George listed his occupation as a merchant on Ida’s birth certificate, though he’s listed as a bookkeeper in the 1871 Census. Their family in that 1871 census consists of George, Caroline, Florence, and Kennedy Margaret, who is listed as their house servant.

The 1871 Census featuring the Laing Family.
George and Caroline et. al are right at the bottom! Retrieved from the Library and Archives of Canada.

Ida is missing from this census; she was most likely born after the enumerator came around to ask about the Laing family. The only record that we could find was her birth certificate. Ida’s stone, however, tells us that she died on August 29, 1872 aged 1 year, 2 months, and 4 days.

Ida’s description in our burial book is quite empty. She’s listed as being from London and is listed as being 14 months old. Ida’s occupation is listed as “father merchant.” Our burial books often list a child’s parent’s occupation. Sometimes the books will even just list “f. occupation,” which was quite confusing to run across at first!

The Laing Family in the 1881 Census.

The Laing family has grown by the time the 1881 census is taken: George and Caroline, now 40 and 41 respectively, have brought four more children into the world. Oswald Morley Laing was born on July 28, 1872, which was a few months before Ida died. Edith Laing was born on April 21, 1874 and Charles Herbert Laing was born soon after on May 8, 1875. Charles passed away just 9 months later in February 1876 and was buried near Ida that same month.

George and Caroline’s sixth child, George Stanley Laing, was born on Sept 24 1877. Caroline then gave birth to the couple’s seventh child Percy Sutherland on November 5 1879. The 1881 census lists 7 people in their household as it doesn’t record Ida and Charles. Deaths were only recorded in the census if they had taken place within the last 12 months – more on this in an upcoming blog post.

The 1891 census adds Mabel Elizabeth Laing to the household as she was born on July 30, 1881. This census also lists George’s profession as “Dept of Agencies (Managing),” which is quite a step up in both status and descriptiveness from “Merchant.” Geo and Karoline Laing (their names are spelled incorrectly) are 52 and 51, Florence is 21, Edith is 16, George Stanley is 16, Percy is 11, and Mabel is 9. This census also has a new enumerator and his handwriting is much easier to read than the previous two.

But in the 10 years between this 1891 census and the next in 1901, the Laing family leaves London for good.

Where did the family go during 1901?

The Laing family moved to Winnipeg, Manitoba between 1891 and 1901. The 1901 census lists George as 61, Caroline as 60, and George Stanley as 23. George and Caroline’s remaining 5 children have spread out across the United States. Florence ends up in Fargo, North Dakota, Edith moves to New York, New York in 1897, and Percy winds up in Seattle, Washington. All the 1900-1905 censuses in those areas list their respective Laing family member. All except for Edith are buried in the cities they lived in. Edith will be buried next to her young siblings in Woodland when she passes away on November 24, 1948.

George Stanley deviated from his siblings and remained in Winnipeg. He married Winnipeg resident Mabel Florence Bradshaw in 1905 and enlisted in the Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Forces in 1915. He lists his occupation as a chartered accountant on his attestation papers. He returns to Winnipeg after being wounded in Passchendaele in 1917. He is currently buried in St. John’s Anglican Cemetery in Winnipeg along with his father and mother.

So why isn’t everyone in Woodland?

The reason why only three of the ten Laings are buried at Woodland is unknown. The Laing family had room for everyone in their plot, but only Ida, Charles, and Edith are buried there. Census records and the occasional birth certificate allow us to trace general movements through time and space. These kinds of records do, however, leave out all the stories that take place along the way. But with the help of Ancestry.com and Libraries and Archives Canada, we’ve been able to piece a rough timeline of the Laing family and their time in London and elsewhere.

We’ll have another blog post coming soon talking about why we couldn’t find Ida’s death certificate – you’ll never look at Vital Statistics the same way again after reading it! We’ll also have another cemetery story time from Marjorie, as well as a special story about Dr. William Maurice Bucke and the compassionate care he was known for at the London Asylum for the Insane in the late 1800s. Stay tuned, and thanks for reading!

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